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Fighter / Attack:
   Bell P-39 Airacobra
   Bell P-63 Kingcobra
   Brewster Buffalo
   Chance-Vought F-4U Corsair
   Curtiss P-40 Warhawk
   Curtiss SB2C Helldiver
   Douglas A-1 Skyraider
   Douglas A-26 Invader
   Douglas SBD Dauntless
   Fairey Firefly
   Focke-Wulf Fw 190
   Grumman F4F Wildcat
   Grumman F6F Hellcat
   Grumman F7F Tigercat
   Grumman F8F Bearcat
   Grumman TBF Avenger
   Hawker Hurricane
   Hawker Sea Fury
   Lockheed P-38 Lightning
   Messerschmitt Bf-109
   Mitsubishi A6M Zero-Sen
   North American P-51 Mustang

   Polikarpov I-16
   Republic P-47 Thunderbolt
   Supermarine Spitfire
   Yakovlev Yak-3
   Yakovlev Yak-9


Trainers:
  
Beechcraft AT-11 Kansan (C-45)
   Beechcraft T-34 Mentor
   Boeing / Stearman PT-17

   Commonwealth CA-25 Winjeel
   Commonwealth CA-1 Wirraway
   DeHavilland DHC-1 Chipmunk
   DeHavilland DH-82 Tiger Moth
   Fairchild PT-19 Cornell
   Hunting / Percival Provost
   Meyers OTW
   Nanchang CJ-6
   Naval Aircraft Factory N3N
   N. Am. BT-9 / BT-14 / Yale
   N. Am. T-6 Texan / SNJ / Harvard
   N. American T-28 Trojan

   Piaggio P149
   Ryan PT-22 Recruit

   Scottish Aviation T1 Bulldog
   Vultee BT-13 Valiant
   Yakovlev Yak-11
   Yakovlev Yak-18
   Yakovlev Yak-52


Bombers:
   Avro Lancaster
   Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress
   Boeing B-29 Superfortress
   Bristol Blenheim / Bolingbroke
   Consolidated B-24 Liberator
   Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer

   Douglas A-3 Skywarrior
   DeHavilland Mosquito
   Fairey Swordfish
   Heinkel He-111 / Casa 2.111

   Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon / Ventura
   Martin B-26 Marauder
   North American B-25 Mitchell


Transports:
   Beechcraft C-45 (AT-11)

   Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter (KC-97)
   Curtiss C-46 Commando
   Douglas C-47 Skytrain / Dakota
   Douglas C-54 Skymaster

   Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar
   Fairchild C-123 Provider
   Grumman C-1 Trader (S-2)
   Lockheed C-60 Lodestar
   Lockheed C-69 Constellation


Utility / Observation / Special Duty:
   Aeronca L-3 Grasshopper
   Aeronca L-16 Grasshopper
   Antonov AN-2 Colt
   Auster AOP 6/9
   Avro 652 Anson
   Avro Shackleton
   British Taylorcraft I-V
   Cessna L-19 / O-1 Bird Dog
   Cessna O-2 Super Skymaster
   Cessna T-50 / UC-78 Bobcat
   Consolidated PBY Catalina

   DeHavilland U-6A / L-20 Beaver
   Fairey Gannet
   Fairey Swordfish
   Fieseler Fi156 Storch
   Grumman S-2 Tracker (C-1)
   Grumman HU-16 Albatross
   Grumman OV-1 Mohawk
   Junkers Ju 52/3m

   Lockheed P2V Neptune
   Max Holste M.H.1521 Broussard
   Messerschmitt Bf 108 Taifun

   Noorduyn UC-64 Norseman
   North American L-17 Navion
   N. Am./ Rockwell OV-10 Bronco
   Piper L-4 Grasshopper
   Stinson L-5 Sentinel
   Taylorcraft L-2 Grasshopper
   Westland Lysander


Jets:
   Aero L-29 Delfin
   Aero L-39 Albatros
   Aermacchi MB-326
   Avro Vulcan
   BAC Strikemaster
   Blackburn (BAC) Buccaneer
   Canadair Tutor
   Cessna A-37 Dragonfly
   DeHavilland Vampire
   DeHavilland Venom
   English Electric Canberra
   English Electric Lightning
   Folland Gnat
   Fouga CM-170 Magister
   Gloster Meteor
   Grumman F9F Panther
   Hawker Hunter
   Hispano HA-200 Saeta
   Hunting Jet Provost
   Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
   Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star
   McDonnell-Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
   McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom
   Messerschmitt Me-262
   Mikoyan MiG-15
   Mikoyan MiG-17
   Mikoyan MiG-21
   N. Am. F-86 Sabre / FJ-4 Fury
   N. Am. F-100 Super Sabre
   N. Am. / Rockwell T-2 Buckeye
   Northrop T-38 Talon / F-5
   PZL / WSK TS-11 Iskra
   Saab J35 Draken
   Soko G-2A Galeb
   Temco Pinto & Super Pinto


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Boeing / Stearman PT-17 "Kaydet"

(Variants/Other Names: Model 75; NS-1; N2S; PT-13; PT-18; PT-27)

Stearman biplane over Illinois
Wally Falardeau tucks his Boeing PT-17 Stearman in close to the camera over northern Illinois on a cloudy summer day in July 2005. Photo by Buck Wyndham.


History:
Even though the US Army Air Corps needed a new biplane trainer in the mid-1930’s, it moved slowly to acquire one because of the service-wide lack of funding for new airplane purchases. In 1936, following the Navy’s lead the previous year, the Army tentatively bought 26 airframes from Boeing (the Model 75), which the Army named the PT-13. With war on the horizon, this trickle of acquisition soon turned into a torrent; 3519 were delivered in 1940 alone.

Built as a private venture by the Stearman Aircraft Company of Wichita (bought by Boeing in 1934), this two-seat biplane was of mixed construction. The wings were of wood with fabric covering while the fuselage had a tough, welded steel framework, also fabric covered. Either a Lycoming R-680 (PT-13) or Continental R-670 (PT-17) engine powered most models, at a top speed of 124 mph with a 505-mile range. An engine shortage in 1940-41 led to the installation of 225-hp Jacobs R-755 engines on some 150 airframes, and the new designation PT-18.

The US Navy's early aircraft, designated NS-1, eventually evolved into the N2S series, and the Royal Canadian Air Force called their Lend-Lease aircraft PT-27s. (The Canadians were also responsible for the moniker "Kaydet," a name eventually adopted by air forces around the globe).

The plane was easy to fly, and relatively forgiving of new pilots. It gained a reputation as a rugged airplane and a good teacher. Officially named the Boeing Model 75, the plane was (and still is) persistently known as the "Stearman" by many who flew them. It was called the "PT" by the Army, "N2S" by the Navy and "Kaydet" by Canadian forces. By whatever name, more than 10,000 were built by the end of 1945 and at least 1,000 are still flying today worldwide.  [History by Jeff VanDerford.]

Nicknames: Yellow Peril. (Some Stearman owners claim this name resulted specifically from the Stearman's allegedly challenging ground-handling characteristics, but most WWII veterans contend that the nickname was more of a generic reference to the dangerous nature of primary flight training, an endeavor in which the Stearman obviously played a major role. Other aircraft such as the N3N also carried the Yellow Peril nickname.)

Specifications (PT-17):
        Engine: One 220-horsepower Continental R-670-5 piston radial engine (PT-17)
        Weight: Empty 1,936 lbs., Max Takeoff 2,717 lbs.
        Wing Span: 32ft. 2in.
        Length: 24ft. 3in.
        Height: 9ft. 2in.
        Performance:
            Maximum Speed: 124 mph
            Ceiling: 11,200 ft.
            Range: 505 miles
        Armament: None

Number Built: 10,000+

Number Still Airworthy: 1000+

[ Stearman Pilot Report by Budd Davisson ]

Links:
3G Classic Aviation -- Stearman restorations and maintenance in Austria.
450 Stearman Resources -- A website full of information about the 450-hp version of the Stearman.
Air Repair, Inc., Cleveland, Mississippi, USA -- Stearman and engine parts and restorations.
The Airshow -- Lots of interesting Stearman-related information.
Big Sky Stearman -- Wood wing kits for Stearmans, and other services.

Biplane Expo, Bartlesville, Oklahoma, USA

Kansas Instrument -- Overhaul shop for Stearman instruments.
National Biplane Association, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
National Stearman Fly-In, Galesburg, Illinois, USA
Northwest International Biplane Fly-In, Spokane, Washington, USA

Sky Services: Redline Brake Info
Stearman Flight -- Formation flight training organization for Stearmans.
Stearman Restorer's Association (SRA) -- The premiere organization for Stearman restorers, owners and operators.
StearmanWings.com -- Blueprints, and technical information for "Stearman people."
Stearman World Flight
-- Robert Ragozzino's around the-world Stearman flight in 2000.
Vintage Aeroplane Company, Inc. (Europe) -- Stearman repair and restoration. Also has rejuvenated Stearmans for sale.

 

Stearman-A-PictorialHistory.jpg (45271 bytes)

Stearman: A Pictorial History
By Jim Avis and Martin Bowman
Hardcover, 152 pages
Published August 1997 by Motorbooks/Airlife Publ.

Anyone with just the slightest interest in airplanes will surely get a kick out of this fine book! Its 150 pages are lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs from the late 1920s up to 1996. The history and uses of the legendary Stearman biplanes are covered in full in chapters on development, military trainer use, crop dusting use, aircraft restoration, and aerobatics use. Most of the text is in the form of extensive captions for each photograph. Many of the full color photos of restored aircraft are quite stunning. [From a reader review.]

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