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Fighter / Attack:
   Bell P-39 Airacobra
   Bell P-63 Kingcobra
   Brewster Buffalo
   Chance-Vought F-4U Corsair
   Curtiss P-40 Warhawk
   Curtiss SB2C Helldiver
   Douglas A-1 Skyraider
   Douglas A-26 Invader
   Douglas SBD Dauntless
   Fairey Firefly
   Focke-Wulf Fw 190
   Grumman F4F Wildcat
   Grumman F6F Hellcat
   Grumman F7F Tigercat
   Grumman F8F Bearcat
   Grumman TBF Avenger
   Hawker Hurricane
   Hawker Sea Fury
   Lockheed P-38 Lightning
   Messerschmitt Bf-109
   Mitsubishi A6M Zero-Sen
   North American P-51 Mustang

   Polikarpov I-16
   Republic P-47 Thunderbolt
   Supermarine Spitfire
   Yakovlev Yak-3
   Yakovlev Yak-9


Trainers:
  
Beechcraft AT-11 Kansan (C-45)
   Beechcraft T-34 Mentor
   Boeing / Stearman PT-17

   Commonwealth CA-25 Winjeel
   Commonwealth CA-1 Wirraway
   DeHavilland DHC-1 Chipmunk
   DeHavilland DH-82 Tiger Moth
   Fairchild PT-19 Cornell
   Hunting / Percival Provost
   Meyers OTW
   Nanchang CJ-6
   Naval Aircraft Factory N3N
   N. Am. BT-9 / BT-14 / Yale
   N. Am. T-6 Texan / SNJ / Harvard
   N. American T-28 Trojan

   Piaggio P149
   Ryan PT-22 Recruit

   Scottish Aviation T1 Bulldog
   Vultee BT-13 Valiant
   Yakovlev Yak-11
   Yakovlev Yak-18
   Yakovlev Yak-52


Bombers:
   Avro Lancaster
   Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress
   Boeing B-29 Superfortress
   Bristol Blenheim / Bolingbroke
   Consolidated B-24 Liberator
   Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer

   Douglas A-3 Skywarrior
   DeHavilland Mosquito
   Fairey Swordfish
   Heinkel He-111 / Casa 2.111

   Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon / Ventura
   Martin B-26 Marauder
   North American B-25 Mitchell


Transports:
   Beechcraft C-45 (AT-11)

   Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter (KC-97)
   Curtiss C-46 Commando
   Douglas C-47 Skytrain / Dakota
   Douglas C-54 Skymaster

   Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar
   Fairchild C-123 Provider
   Grumman C-1 Trader (S-2)
   Lockheed C-60 Lodestar
   Lockheed C-69 Constellation


Utility / Observation / Special Duty:
   Aeronca L-3 Grasshopper
   Aeronca L-16 Grasshopper
   Antonov AN-2 Colt
   Auster AOP 6/9
   Avro 652 Anson
   Avro Shackleton
   British Taylorcraft I-V
   Cessna L-19 / O-1 Bird Dog
   Cessna O-2 Super Skymaster
   Cessna T-50 / UC-78 Bobcat
   Consolidated PBY Catalina

   DeHavilland U-6A / L-20 Beaver
   Fairey Gannet
   Fairey Swordfish
   Fieseler Fi156 Storch
   Grumman S-2 Tracker (C-1)
   Grumman HU-16 Albatross
   Grumman OV-1 Mohawk
   Junkers Ju 52/3m

   Lockheed P2V Neptune
   Max Holste M.H.1521 Broussard
   Messerschmitt Bf 108 Taifun

   Noorduyn UC-64 Norseman
   North American L-17 Navion
   N. Am./ Rockwell OV-10 Bronco
   Piper L-4 Grasshopper
   Stinson L-5 Sentinel
   Taylorcraft L-2 Grasshopper
   Westland Lysander


Jets:
   Aero L-29 Delfin
   Aero L-39 Albatros
   Aermacchi MB-326
   Avro Vulcan
   BAC Strikemaster
   Blackburn (BAC) Buccaneer
   Canadair Tutor
   Cessna A-37 Dragonfly
   DeHavilland Vampire
   DeHavilland Venom
   English Electric Canberra
   English Electric Lightning
   Folland Gnat
   Fouga CM-170 Magister
   Gloster Meteor
   Grumman F9F Panther
   Hawker Hunter
   Hispano HA-200 Saeta
   Hunting Jet Provost
   Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
   Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star
   McDonnell-Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
   McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom
   Messerschmitt Me-262
   Mikoyan MiG-15
   Mikoyan MiG-17
   Mikoyan MiG-21
   N. Am. F-86 Sabre / FJ-4 Fury
   N. Am. F-100 Super Sabre
   N. Am. / Rockwell T-2 Buckeye
   Northrop T-38 Talon / F-5
   PZL / WSK TS-11 Iskra
   Saab J35 Draken
   Soko G-2A Galeb
   Temco Pinto & Super Pinto


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McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk

(Variants/Other Names: TA-4)


A-4 Skyhawk
(Photo source unknown. Please contact us if you deserve credit.)

History: Initially dubbed 'Heinemann's Hot Rod' after chief design engineer Ed Heinemann, the A-4 Skyhawk is one of the best jet aircraft to have served with the US Navy and Marine Corps. Chosen to replace the A-1 Skyraider, the A-4's small design and light weight gave it the speed and power to exceed the Navy's specifications and fight on until today in air forces around the world.

The delta wing aircraft houses its avionics in the nose, along with a pair of cannons for dealing with aerial adversaries. The wings hold the fuel tanks, and the Pratt & Whitney turbojet fits snugly in the fuselage. Ordered during the Korean War, the A-4 was delivered to the US Navy VA-72 attack squadron on October 26, 1956. Other squadrons were soon re-equipped as soon as aircraft became available. The Marines began receiving their A-4s in January 1957. By the time of the Vietnam War, all carrier wings had at least two Skyhawk squadrons. The A-4s were soon performing most of the Navy's and Marine Corps' light air attack missions over the jungles and mountains of Vietnam. It was not long before McDonnell Douglas also produced a two-seat trainer, the TA-4. The A-4 has been sold to countries around the world and has seen combat with the air forces of Kuwait, Israel and Argentina. Production finally ceased in 1979.

Until recently, both the US Navy and Marine Corps used A-4s for training purposes. Skyhawks are still found serving as frontline units in several smaller countries. As of 2001, there were nine single-seat Skyhawks and three TA-4s on the US civil register, although not all were airworthy.

Nicknames: The Scooter; Bantam Bomber; Heinemann's Hot Rod; Tinker Toy; Mighty Mite; Camel (A-4E and subsequent models with avionics hump); Skyhog; Super Fox (US Navy Fighter Weapons School A-4Fs with bigger engines); Squawk/Kahu (New Zealand); Ahit "Vulture" (Israel); Chickenhawk (Australian Navy).

Specifications (A-4M):
        Engine: One 11,200-pound thrust Pratt & Whitney J52-P-408A turbojet
        Weight: Empty 10,465 lbs., Max Takeoff 24,500 lbs.
        Wing Span: 27ft. 6in.
        Length: 40ft. 3.75in.
        Height: 15ft. 0in.
        Performance:
            Maximum Speed at Sea Level: 670 mph
            Range: 340 miles with 4,000-pound bomb load
        Armament:
            Two 20-mm cannon
            Up to 9,155 pounds of weapons on five external hardpoints

Number Built: 2,960

Number Still Airworthy: Unknown number in active military service; at least three have been flown as privately-operated warbirds. Several dozen are now operated by civilian contractors in the USA.

 [ A-4 Skyhawk Pilot Report by Budd Davisson ]

Links:
Advanced Training Systems International, Mesa, Arizona, USA -- Contract A-4s and instructor pilots.
AeroGroup, Inc., Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA -- Contract fighters available for training, testing and movie work, including a TA-4.
Collings Foundation: TA-4J Skyhawk N524CF
Kiwi Aircraft Images: A-4K Photos
Skyhawk Association




Rampant Raider: An A-4 Skyhawk Pilot in Vietnam
By Steven R. Gray
Hardcover, 384 pages
Published 2007 by Naval Institute Press

A-4 pilot Stephen R. Gray writes about his experiences flying combat sorties from the deck of an aircraft carrier during one of the most intense periods of aerial combat in U.S. history.

Price: $21.45 (You save 34%)

 

McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
By Brad Elward
Hardcover, 200 pages
Published September 2000 by Crowood Press (UK)

The most comprehensive book about the A-4 Skyhawk on the market today, this large book contains a detailed history of the airplane and each of its variants; interviews with those who flew it in Vietnam; and many interesting, previously unpublished photos.

Price: $52.95

 

 

 

 


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